World permiere for Human Traces

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By SHELLEY TOPP

Human Traces had its world premiere at the Isaac Theatre Royal in Christchurch last Friday.

The taut psychological thriller, produced by Leithfields Nadia Maxwell who attended the premiere with her husband Dom, was shown to a large crowd on the second night of the New Zealand International Film Festival.

The film was shot in rugged parts of the Catlins, on the south-eastern coast of the South Island, and on Banks Peninsula, and filmed over 24 days in extremely harsh weather.

It tells the story of two scientists, husband and wife Sarah (played by Sophie Henderson) and Glenn (played by Mark Mitchinson), who work on a remote sub-antarctic island.

The couple are monitoring the ecosystem on the island and working to restore it when they are joined by a mysterious young stranger named Pete (played by Vinnie Bennett). His arrival triggers paranoia, and deception begins to disrupt the order of things on the island.

“It is about humans and how they are shaped by forces they can be entirely oblivious to, says the director and writer, Nic Gorman who also attended the premiere.

He spoke to the audience before the film and afterwards he was joined by other members of the cast and crew, Nadia, Sophie, Vinnie and also the festival host in Christchurch, Nick Paris, in a question and answer session with the audience.

Human Traces is the first feature film for Nic and Nadia.

Nic, who was originally from Christchurch but now lives in Wellington, said it was “overwhelming” to have a world premiere for the South Island-driven film in Christchurch at the Isaac Theatre Royal.

He was proud of what his cast and crew had achieved.

“Hopefully you are going to be blown away by what you are going to see on screen”.

The film received loud applause from the audience at the end and was described by one man during the question and answer session as a “brilliant film”.

Nadia said after the premiere that Human Traces would be shown at the Melbourne International Film Festival this weekend, “where we are the sole New Zealand narrative feature in the festival”.